Stacks Image 1758

MythbornRise Of The Adepts

V. Lakshman


A plume of power erupts, pointing to an ancient Gate between our world and the Aeris, creatures born from myths and legends, hungering for worship, and offering only possession and slavery in return. An order of monks known as Adepts sense the Gate, but are not alone. Elder races have taken note and converge on the Gate's next appearance, a desert stronghold known as Bara'cor. Lacking much of the ancient lore and might, the Adepts still send one of their very best to investigate: Silbane.


Stacks Image 1321


SILVER MEDAL WINNER, Best Sci-Fi / Fantasy / Horror E-Book, 2014 IPPY Awards

Stacks Image 1653
Stacks Image 1648
Stacks Image 1659


Debut fantasy novelist Lakshman offers a rousing epic in which supernatural beings threaten the world of their own creators.

Did gods and demons always exist, or did their believers bring them into being? That question springboards this Tolkien-esque tale, which includes plenty of fresh twists. In a threatened world called Edyn, archmages and adepts, including the powerful Silbane Petracles, train in a life-sustaining discipline called the Way. Azrael and Lilyth, an angel and a demon who lead the power-hungry Aeris, gear up to fight them in a looming conflict that will determine the fate of the world. At the center of it all is a student of the Way, Arek Winterthorn—a seemingly innocent young man of unknown, perhaps catastrophic, origin.

The text is deftly written… Lakshman shows a plate spinner’s skill as he smoothly balances the novel’s diverse elements and keeps the action rolling at a fast clip. The author shapes his ambitious, entertaining story with a lengthy menu of familiar genre elements—good and bad mages, anti-magic fanatics, dragons, dwarves and elves. He also includes bloody combat, a sentient sword, feisty princes and princesses, noble kings and warriors, and gates to other planes of existence—and even mixes in concepts from world religions and ancient mythologies. (The author’s descriptions of physical combat, training and strategy have an authenticity that’s reminiscent of Elizabeth Moon’s 1992 masterwork The Deed of Paksenarrion.)

An ambitious, colorful and highly readable fantasy epic. - Kirkus Reviews